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News & Press Releases
2010
  1. UW Pancreatic Cancer Surveillance Program Featured on KING 5 HealthLink »
  2. A Decade of Refinements in Marrow and Stem Cell Transplantation Improves Long-Term Survival of Blood Cancers »
  3. UWMC Transplant Program Nationally Recognized for Superb Performance »
  4. UWGI at the 61st Annual AASLD Liver Meeting® »
  5. Colonoscopy Repeats Greater with Non-Specialists »
  6. UWGI at 2010 ACG Annual Scientific Meeting & Postgraduate Course »
  7. Dr. John Inadomi Appointed New Head of the Division of Gastroenterology »
  8. Dr. Sum P. Lee Receives 2010 AASLD Distinguished Achievement Award »
2009
  1. Hepatitis C: Access to Care »
  2. One of the World's Smallest Microscopes is at the UW »
  3. Seattle Metropolitan Magazine's Top Doctors of 2009 »
  4. Dr. David Kearney's Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) Program Featured in the Seattle Times »
  5. Dr. David Kearney Receives ACG Grant to Study Effects of Stress Reduction on Gut Microbiota »
  6. Extreme BMI Cause for Concern in Liver Transplantation: Underweight and Very Severely Obese Patients at Risk (Liver Transplantation: Press Release) »
  7. Dr. Christina Surawicz Receives 2009 ACG Berk/Fise Clinical Achievement Award »
  8. The GI Division Welcomes Drs. Brian Weston,
    Lei Yu and Timothy Zisman to the Faculty »
  9. 2009 Fellowship Trainees »
  10. Dr. Teresa Brentnall Receives ARRA Grant to Support Proteomic Studies of Chronic Pancreatitis »
  11. Dr. Renuka Bhattacharya Interviewed by the NIDA Center
    for Functional Genomics »
  12. The Gut Course (HuBio 551) Earns High Praise in 2009
    and an Award for Excellence in Teaching for Dr. Bruce Silverstein »
  13. Dr. Michael Schuffler Speaks at the 2009 AGMD Digestive Motility Symposium »
News & Press Releases: 2010
UW Pancreatic Cancer Surveillance Program
Featured on KING 5 HealthLink

KING 5's Meg Coyle, anchor of KING 5's Weekend Morning News, visits Drs. Teresa Brentnall and Michael Saunders to see if her family history puts her at risk for developing pancreatic cancer. Her mother died of the disease when she was only 42 years old, a factor that may mean she has a genetic pre-disposition and increased risk for developing this deadly disease herself. In this segment, Meg consults with Dr. Teresa Brentnall, who leads the University of Washington Pancreatic Cancer Surveillance Program, and then undergoes an endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), performed by Dr. Michael Saunders, Director of the Digestive Disease Center. EUS is one of the surveillance methods used to detect any abnormalities in the pancreas that may indicate cancer. Watch the Video »

Research done by the UW Pancreatic Cancer Surveillance Program has shown that pancreatic cancer is hereditary in at least 10% of cases; the risk of pancreatic cancer is increased 3-fold if one first-degree relative is affected. Having multiple affected members increases the risk even more, so that some family members have a 50-50 chance of inheriting pancreatic cancer. Learn More »
A Decade of Refinements in Marrow and Stem Cell Transplantation Improves Long-Term Survival of Blood Cancers
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center Press Release
Media Contact: Christi Ball Loso, (206) 667-5215, closo@fhcrc.org


"SEATTLE — Nov. 24, 2010 —A decade of refinements in marrow and stem cell transplantation to treat blood cancers significantly reduced the risk of treatment-related complications and death, according to an institutional self-analysis of transplant-patient outcomes conducted at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center.

Among the major findings of the study, which compared transplant-patient outcomes in the mid-‘90s with those a decade later: After adjusting for factors known to be associated with outcome, the researchers observed a statistically significant 60 percent reduction in the risk of death within 200 days of transplant and a 41 percent reduction in the risk of overall mortality at any time after transplant.

“Everything we looked at improved a decade after the initial analysis,” said George McDonald, M.D., a Hutchinson Center gastroenterologist and corresponding author of the paper, which was published Nov. 25, 2010 in the New England Journal of Medicine..." Read Full FHCRC Press Release » | Read NEJM Editorial »

Reduced Mortality after Allogeneic Hematopoietic-Cell Transplantation
Ted A. Gooley, Ph.D., Jason W. Chien, M.D., Steven A. Pergam, M.D., M.P.H., Sangeeta Hingorani, M.D., M.P.H., Mohamed L. Sorror, M.D., Michael Boeckh, M.D., Paul J. Martin, M.D., Brenda M. Sandmaier, M.D., Kieren A. Marr, M.D., Frederick R. Appelbaum, M.D., Rainer Storb, M.D., and George B. McDonald, M.D. N Engl J Med 2010; 363:2091-2101. Read NEJM Article »
UWMC Liver Transplant Program
Nationally Recognized for Superb Performance

The UWMC Liver Transplantation Program has received national recognition from the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services (HHS) for superb performance in transplantation. Out of 740 organ donation and transplant programs evaluated for the award, only 10 silver medals and 1 gold medal were awarded across the entire country. Transplant programs were evaluated based on a combination of factors, including 1-year post transplant survival rates, deceased donor transplantation rates, and waitlist mortality rates. With a 1-year survival rate of 90.8%, the UWMC Liver Transplantation Program received one of only two silver medals awarded for performance in liver transplantation. The Kidney Transplantation Program also won a silver medal, making UWMC the only medical center in the U.S. to be awarded two medals of honor in the silver category. UWMC also received a bronze medal for its Kidney/Pancreas Transplantation Program. Awards were handed out by HRSA officials at the Sixth Annual Learning Congress for the Donation and Transplantation Community of Practice in Grapevine, Texas.

Dr. Robert L. Carithers, Jr. (pictured, left). is the Medical Director of the UWMC Liver Transplantation Program, as well as Director of the Liver Care Line. UWGI Hepatology faculty also responsible for the success of this program are Drs. Renuka Bhattacharya (pictured, middle), Iris Liou (pictured, right), Lei Yu, and Charles Landis. The transplant team includes surgeons, nurses, physician assistants, pharmacists, social workers, coordinators, and dietitians.

HRSA Press Release »| UW DOM Press Release » | UWeek Article »
UWGI at the 61st Annual AASLD Liver Meeting ®
UWGI attended the 61st Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, held from October 29 - November 2 at the Hynes Convention Center in Boston, Massachussetts. The Liver Meeting® provides a forum of exchange for groundbreaking basic, translational and clinical research in diseases of the liver and biliary tract, and in liver trasnplantation. It is the premier event in the science and practice of hepatology, where the cutting edge in the study and treatment of liver and biliary diseases is defined. Below is a list of research UWGI shared with the AASLD scientific and clinical community:
  • Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Infection and Pathogenesis: From Systems Biology to Translational Research. D. L. Diamond; A. L. Rasmussen; N. J. Susnow; S. Datta; C. Magaret; B. M. Webb-Robertson; A. Krasnoselsky; K. E. Burnum; M. M. Yeh; J. McDermott; J. M. Jacobs; M. A. Gritsenko; R. Bhattacharya; J. D. Perkins; R. L. Carithers; I. W. Liou; S. Strom; C. LeCiel; V. S. Carter; D. E. Purdy; K. Walters; A. M. Larson; X. Peng; S. C. Proll; K. M. Waters; R. D. Smith; S. Self; M. G. Katze Read Abstract »
  • Patient and Graft Survival Following Liver Retransplant for Recurrent Hepatitis C Cirrhosis: A Single Center Experience. T. E. Halterman; L. Yu; R. Bhattacharya Read Abstract »
  • A response-guided therapy for a better management of patients severe alcoholic hepatitis treated with corticosteroids. A. Louvet; F. Artru; F. Wartel; J. G. O'Grady; R. L. Carithers; M. Phillips; C. L. Mendenhall; S. Naveau; V. Canva-Delcambre; T. R. Morgan; P. Mathurin Read Abstract »
Colonoscopy Repeats Greater with Non-Specialists
From Reuters Health, by Amy Norton, 9/13/2010
Dr. Cynthia Ko’s publication in the American Journal of Gastroenterology titled, Utilization and Predictors of Early Repeat Colonoscopy in Medicare Beneficiaries, was recently featured in a Reuters Health article. According to the article (9/3, Norton), “Older adults who have a colonoscopy performed by a family doctor, internist or general surgeon are somewhat more likely to need another one within a year compared with those who have the procedure done by a gastroenterologist, a new report finds. The study, based on Medicare data for more than 300,000 colonoscopy procedures, found that 5 percent of patients had a repeat colonoscopy within a year.”
Read Full Article »| Read Journal Abstract »
UWGI at the 2010 ACG Meeting
UWGI attended the ACG 2010 Annual Scientific Meeting and Postgraduate Course, held from October 15-20 at the Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center in San Antonio, Texas. This meeting offers the latest clinical information on key and cutting-edge topics for the GI physician, showcases research, and provides a wealth of patient-related clinical data and experiences. Below is a list of research UWGI shared with the ACG scientific and clinical community:
  • A Prospective Study of Aspirin Use and the Risk of Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Men. Edward Huang, MD, MPH, Lisa Strate, MD, MPH, Wendy Ho, MD, MPH, Salina Lee, MD, Andrew Chan, MD, MPH. Read Abstract »
  • Comorbid Diabetes Mellitus Increases the Risk for Surgery in Patients with Crohn’s Disease. Jason Harper, MD; Mariko Welch, MS; Mika Sinanan, MD; Ghassan Wahbeh, MD; Scott Lee, MD. Read Abstract »
  • Assessment of the Safety of Certolizumab Pegol Associated with the Time of Previous Biologic Treatment of Crohn’s Disease at a Single North American Site. Chelle Wheat, BS, Cynthia Ko, MD, Ghassan Wahbeh, MD, Cory Cullinan, RN, Scott Etter, RN, Mika Sinanan, MD, Scott Lee, MD. Read Abstract »
  • IBS Symptoms: It’s in the Genes. Ashley Evans, MD, Sang-Eun Jun, PhC, RN, Margaret Heitkemper, PhD, Monica Jarrett, PhD, Kevin Cain, PhD, Christopher Carlson, MD. Read Abstract »
  • Assessment of the Efficacy of Certolizumab Pegol for the Treatment of Crohn’s Disease at a Single North American Center. Scott Lee, MD, Cynthia Ko, MD, Ghassan Wahbeh, MD, Jason Harper, MD, Cory Cullinan, RN, Scott Etter, RN, Mika Sinanan, MD, Christopher Naumann, MD, Chelle Wheat, BS. Read Abstract »
Dr. John Inadomi Appointed
New Head of the Division of Gastroenterology

From UW Medicine Online News
John M. Inadomi, professor of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) School of Medicine and chief of clinical gastroenterology at San Francisco General Hospital, has been appointed the fourth head of the Division of Gastroenterology, effective in July. Inadomi will also be appointed to the Cyrus E. Rubin Endowed Chair in Medicine, previously held by Sum P. Lee, who served as division head from 1995 to 2008. Toan Nguyen, professor of medicine, has been acting head of the division for the past two years... Read Article »
Dr. Sum P. Lee Receives the 2010 AASLD
Distinguished Achievement Award & Joins UWGI as the
2010 Wade Volwiler Visiting Professor

The American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD), the leading international organization of scientists and healthcare professionals for preventing and curing liver disease, has selected Sum-Ping Lee, M.D., Ph.D., to be the recipient of their 2010 Distinguished Achievement Award. Dr. Lee, currently Dean of the Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine of the University of Hong Kong, was an active member of our GI Division for 23 years (1985-2008) and was the Cyrus E. Rubin Professor of Medicine and Head of the Division of Gastroenterology from 1995 to 2007...
Read Article & Testimonials »

The UW GI Division was also pleased to welcome Dr. Lee as this year's 2010 Wade Volwiler Visiting Professor, an annual lectureship named for the division's first Head, Dr. Wade Volwiler. A graduate of Harvard and a fellowship trainee of the Mayo Foundation, Dr. Volwiler led the GI Division for 31 years. Dr. Lee is also a former Head of the UW GI Division, which he led for 13 years, from 1995 to 2007. Dr. Lee presented at the Department of Medicine Grand Rounds lecture series, the PNWGS Meet the Professor Evening Program, and the GI Division's Frontiers in Gastroenterology & Hepatology series. His lecture topics included (1) A Tale of Two Oppossums and a Discussion on Gallstones, (2) China Rising & Health Care Reform, and (3) Why Are Lampreys Green and a Discussion on Liver Stem Cells. Dr. Lee's lecture on gallstones is available to view online, along with a "muscial review" of the gastrointestinal system, as sung by UW GI Division faculty each year to second year medical students at the end of the Gut Course (lyrics by, Dr. David Saunders).



News & Press Releases: 2009
Hepatitis C: Access to Care
From UW Department of Medicine, Fall 2009 Newsletter
Chronic infection with hepatitis C virus(HCV) affects nearly 3 million Americans — including 153,000 in Washington — and is the leading cause for liver transplantation. Effective treatments are available but they are expensive, rife with side effects, and not readily accessible to all. Many people receive inadequate treatment or none at all. For patients in or near Seattle, outstanding specialized care for hepatitis is available at Harborview. The Hepatitis and Liver Clinic there is the largest provider of viral hepatitis care in the region, with four clinicians seeing patients five days a week. People living far from large medical centers have fewer options. Two efforts led by Department of Medicine faculty members are addressing the critical problem of access to care for this growing chronic disease: Jason Dominitz (GI) directs the eight-year-old VA Northwest Hepatitis C Resource Center, and John D. Scott (AID), assistant director of the Harborview Hepatitis and Liver Clinic, leads a new three-year telemedicine project for HCV in rural and underserved populations across the state... Read Article » | Read Full DOM Newsletter (Fall 2009) »
One of the World's Smallest Microscopes is at the UW
The UW Digestive Disease Center is the first in the Pacific Northwest to be using the world’s smallest flexible microscope, known as Cellvizio. Dr. Michael Saunders and Dr. Joo Ha Hwang are using the microscope to improve detection and speed treatment of various types of GI and biliary diseases. The Cellvizio tool allows them to view tissue inside a patient's body in real time at the cellular level so they can precisely pinpoint tissue that should be removed or treated. The Digestive Disease Center and their work with Cellvizio was recently featured in an article by the Seattle PI and broadcast in a KOMO 4 News HealthWorks segment.
Press Release » | Seattle PI Article » | KOMO 4 News Video »
Seattle Metropolitan Magazine's Top Doctors of 2009
Dr. Michael Saunders was named as one of Seattle Metropolitan Magazine’s Top Doctors of 2009, which highlights 347 practitioners in 80 specialties. Clinical Faculty members, Drs. David Gilbert (Polyclinic) Richard Kozarek (Virginia Mason) and J. Thomas Ylvisaker (Group Health), were also named Top Doctors of 2009 in the sub-specialty of Gastroenterology. Nearly 1,200 physicians, nurses, and physician’s assistants in King, Kitsap, and Snohomish counties nominated colleagues they would choose to treat themselves and their loved ones.
View 2009 Top Doctors »
Dr. David Kearney's Mindfulness-Based Stress
Reduction (MBSR) Program Featured in the Seattle Times


Dr. Kearney’s research focuses on the psychological aspect of functional GI disorders, including the effect of psychological and physical trauma in former POWs with irritable bowel syndrome. His particular interest is in the application of stress reduction techniques in health care. Dr. Kearney leads a Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) program at the Seattle VA Puget Sound Health Care System, which has treated many patients with chronic physical and mental health conditions. MBSR is a validated program of mindfulness meditation and gentle yoga available at approximately 250 hospitals nationwide, and it is endorsed by the NIH-NCCAM as a model of mind-body intervention. Dr. Kearney’s program was recently featured in an article by the Seattle Times.
Read Full Article »

Dr. David Kearney Also Receives ACG Grant to
Study Effects of Stress Reduction on Gut Microbiota


The gut microbiota is known to be integral to gastrointestinal health and disease. Psychological stress has been shown to significantly alter the gastrointestinal microbiota of rats, rhesus monkeys, and humans. These studies have consistently shown decreases in lactobacilli among other changes in species that correlate with an increase in diarrheal symptoms. While it is unclear whether stress causes diarrhea leading indirectly to a disruption in the native microbiota, or whether stress leads directly to changes in the microbiota that then lead to diarrhea; there is a growing body of evidence to support the latter. Differences in microbiota have also been shown to be present in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and predispose or protect against other forms of diarrhea including bacterial gastroenteritis and radiation-induced diarrhea. In addition, treatment with probiotics containing lactobacillus and other species has been shown to help alleviate IBS symptoms. Stress is hypothesized to act on the microbiota via the brain-gut axis through endocrine, immunological, and/or neurological pathways. Dr. Kearney, along with Dr. Chris Damman (future GI fellow), will analyze the fecal microbiota in IBS patients before and after an 8-week-stress reduction (MBSR) course compared with patients with PTSD and IBS undergoing usual care without a stress-reduction course.
Extreme BMI Cause for Concern in Liver Transplantation: Underweight and Very Severely Obese Patients at Risk
(Liver Transplantation: Press Release)


A recent study by doctors at the University of Washington explained that patients who are significantly underweight or very severely obese prior to liver transplantation are at increased risk of death following transplantation surgery. These findings, from the largest known observation of liver transplantation at the extremes of BMI, are published in the August issue of Liver Transplantation.
[“Liver Transplantation at the Extremes of Body Mass Index,” André Dick, Austin Spitzer, Catherine Seifert, Alysun Deckert, R.L. Carithers, Jorge Reyes, James Perkins, Liver Transplantation, August 2009.]

The research team led by André A. S. Dick, M.D., Department of Surgery, Division of Transplantation, University of Washington investigated the impact of pre-transplantation Body Mass Index (BMI) on post-liver transplantation patient survival. The doctors hypothesized that individuals at the extremes of BMI were at increased risk of death following liver transplantation. In this study, patients with BMI < 18.5 kg/m2 were in the underweight group, with 1,827 transplanted, while those with BMI ≥ 40 kg/m2 were designated very severely obese, with 1,447 transplanted. Patients with BMI between 18.5 – 40 kg/m2 were assigned to a control group (68,172 patients) because they had similar survival rates.
Read Full Press Release » | Read Abstract »
Dr. Christina Surawicz Receives
2009 ACG Berk/Fise Clinical Achievement Award


Dr. Christina Surawicz, Professor of Medicine and GI Section Chief for Harborview Medical Center, was recently honored with the 2009 Berk/Fise Clinical Achievement Award in recognition of her distinguished contributions to clinical gastroenterology. Specific criteria for the award include, in addition to a career of distinguished clinical practice of gastroenterology, contributions in patient care, clinical science, clinical education, technological innovation, and public and community service. The American College of Gastroenterology (ACG) presents the award to one member or fellow only when he or she merits the recognition. Dr. Surawicz was presented the award at the ACG Leadership Dinner during the 2009 ACG Annual Scientific Meeting and Postgraduate Course in San Diego. Dr. Surawicz was also recently elected a Master of the American College of Gastroenterology (ACG), another rare honor conferred by the ACG upon physicians who have demonstrated distinguished service and leadership to the College and to the field of clinical gastroenterology, patient care and education. Dr. Surawicz is a past president of the ACG and has served it in many other capacities. She is also a past president of the Western Association of Physicians. In addition, Dr. Surawicz is Assistant Dean for Faculty Development in the UW School of Medicine, Adjunct Professor of Medical Education and Biomedical Informatics, and an Affiliate Member of the Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center.
The GI Division Welcomes Drs. Brian Weston,
Lei Yu and Timothy Zisman to the Faculty


We are sincerely pleased to welcome three new faculty members to the GI Division. Dr. Brian Weston and Dr. Timothy Zisman have joined the UW Digestive Disease Center, and Dr. Lei Yu has joined the UW Liver Care Line. Dr. Weston’s expertise is in advanced therapeutic endoscopy, and he joins us from the Beacon Hospital in Dublin, Ireland. Dr. Zisman’s expertise is inflammatory bowel disease, and he joins us from the University of Chicago. Dr. Lei Yu is a recent graduate of our Gastroenterology and Advanced Transplant Hepatology fellowship training programs. His expertise in epidemiology and interest in nutrition will allow him to study a relatively unexplored aspect of liver disease. We are delighted to have them as part of the GI faculty and recently asked each of them to share a little bit more about themselves.
More About Dr. Weston » | More About Dr. Yu » | More About Dr. Zisman »
2009 Fellowship Trainees


This year the GI Division welcomed four new trainees to the Gastroenterology Fellowship Program, Drs. Karlee Ausk, Margaret Eugenio, Arema Pereira, and Luke Richey. Joining the Advanced Transplant Hepatology Fellowship Program is Dr. Charles Landis. And joining the GI Training Grant are Drs. Tatiana Khokhlova and Elizabeth Poole.
Dr. Teresa Brentnall Receives ARRA Grant to
Support Proteomic Studies of Chronic Pancreatitis


On February 17th, 2009, President Obama signed the Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) or Stimulus Package to restart the economy. The package contains extensive funding for science, engineering research and infrastructure, and more limited funding for education, social sciences and the arts. Dr. Teresa Brentnall has received an ARRA grant to support proteomic studies of chronic pancreatitis. Chronic pancreatitis, a destructive disease of the pancreas, is difficult to diagnosis and can present with a variety of symptoms. The incidence of chronic pancreatitis is not known; hospital admission and discharge summaries suggest at least 60,000 patients in the US per year, however these are under-estimates and it is clear that many patients have occult disease. The financial burden of pancreatitis to society is substantial: with loss of work and health care costs, the burden approaches $2.5 billion annually. There are currently no good bloods tests for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis; endoscopic studies and CT scan are the standard approaches for the diagnosis, with endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) combined with pancreatic function tests (PFT) being the most sensitive. The etiology of pancreatitis is multi-fold but all lead to progressive scarring and loss of pancreatic function; the understanding of the molecular events that underlie the progressive disease is limited. Dr. Brentall’s research group will study the protein changes that underlie the early and late stages of chornic pancreatitis using proteomic approaches. The discovery of these proteins will not only provide insight into the pathogenesis, but can also provide targets for biomarkers of disease. Overall, Dr. Brentnall and her research team believe that these proteomic studies can provide a better understanding of the events that underlie this debilitating disease, identify proteins that will be good candidates for biomarker development, and may ultimately lead to an inexpensive and non-invasive blood test for chronic pancreatitis.
Dr. Renuka Bhattacharya Interviewed
by the NIDA Center for Functional Genomics


Dr. Renuka Bhattacharya was recently highlighted as a new NIDA clinician. The NIDA Center for Functional Genomics at the University of Washington is a National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) P30 Center. This center supplies the resources needed to apply cutting-edge genomic, proteomic, and bioinformatic technologies to the study of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and AIDS, chronic viral infections that are a direct consequence of drug abuse and addiction. They work with a variety of biologic resources, including serial liver biopsies from patients with recurrent HCV after liver transplantation, biopsies from patients co-infected with HCV and HIV-1, and experimental systems for HCV infection such as the SCID-beige/Alb-uPA chimeric mouse model and the HCV 2a in vitro infection system.
Read Interview » | Visit NIDA Website »
The Gut Course (HuBio 551) Earns High Praise in 2009 and an Award for Excellence in Teaching for Dr. Bruce Silverstein

Carrying on in the tradition of Dr. David Saunders, the Gut Course (HuBio 551) was once again the highest rated second year medical course, as voted by the medical students. 2009 was the 40th year in a row that the Gut Course has earned this honor. This year, Drs. J. Donald Ostrow, Michael Saunders, and Bruce Silverstein served as course chairs and were supported by Drs. Charles Pope and Michael Schuffler, as well as by our gastroenterology fellows; Drs. Darby Robinson-O'Neill, Christine Schlenker, and Janelle Brown-Chang. The Gut Course also earned Dr. Bruce Silverstein the David R. Saunders Memorial Award for Excellence in Teaching, an award created by the Medical Student Association to honor the course's original chair, Dr. David Saunders, who earned four Distinguished Teaching Awards and the honor of Teacher Superior in Perpetuity for his dedication to the course. This award is given to a second-year course chair or lecturer who has demonstrated excellence in any and all aspects of teaching second year medical students. Dr. Silverstein commented that the award is a reflection of the dedication and hard work of the entire course's faculty and support staff. We are looking forward to 2010 and the 41st year of the Gut Course!
Dr. Michael Schuffler Speaks at the 2009
AGMD Digestive Motility Symposium


Dr. Schuffler spoke on the Pathologic Basis of Chronic Intestinal Pseudo-Obstruction Syndromes at the July 2009 AGMD Digestive Motility Symposium in Bedford, Massachusetts. The Association of Gastrointestinal Motility Disorders is composed of health professionals and lay people dedicated to educating about severe gastrointestinal motility disorders, such as chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction and severe enteric dysmotility, and providing support to affected patients and their families. It publishes a monthly newsletter and holds a biannual conference which brings together health care providers who have a clinical and research interest in these disorders in order to share information and report new findings. The recent meeting, held on July 24-26th, was attended by several hundred people from around the country, including adult and pediatric gastroenterologists, surgeons, nutritionists, psychologists, patients and family members. About the Talk »
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